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New Clients

As always, I am so very behind on stories of my kiddos. Sadly, Rhythm has been moved to another care program (I believe he now has a nurse attendant) due to increased seizures. I do miss him. In the meantime, I have two new autistic kids on my roster– a moderately verbal 11-year-old girl with a relatively uncommon genetic disorder, and a 7-year-old boy with a diagnosis of classic nonverbal autism.

I quickly became one of the 11-year-old’s favorite people. Among other reasons, I like one of her favorite singers and can sing her most famous song fairly well. I am going to call this girl Euterpe, after the Greek muse of song, because she is passionately obsessed with music, particularly pop songs with female vocalists. I spend most of my time with her singing, or else making other sound effects on request (animals, vehicles, you name it). She lives with a typically-developing sister, whom I’ll call Calliope (muse of epics– she does love to write!), and a mother who seems to be in a state of perpetual motion, effervescing with ideas, plans that change every few seconds, and a humming, cheerful energy. I find her overwhelming from a sheer sensory standpoint. It’s a good thing Euterpe is someone who primarily seeks rather than avoids sensation!

I’m just getting to know the 7-year-old boy, but I find him immensely charming already. He buzzes around the apartment– climbing, touching, observing everything, never still, flitting like a hummingbird from one entertainment to another, hands a-blur in the air. His high, clear voice echoes the words others use in perfect intonation but an octave higher. He seems to want to take in the world– touching everything, getting on top of or above everything, and always bouncing, bouncing, bouncing… then concentrating intently on a single activity that catches his attention– a table full of playdoh, shapes to cut out of paper (his fine motor skills are amazingly good), cogs that fit together, a youtube video of Thomas the Train. He has a slightly older brother and a mom and dad. His parents are very affectionate with him, and his mother seems to know him very well in the sense of being able to predict his actions and moods in that way mothers can, but I get the feeling no one quite understands him, which makes me sad. I’ve sat through one ABA session with him and wound up more or less hating the behavioral technician. Euterpe’s ABA tech is much better, and her supervisor is pretty excellent as people in these programs go.

I’m also working with a 10-year-old girl with Down syndrome, which is a very new experience for me and not at all what I’m familiar with. She’s a very determined and independent young lady, and fortunately, I mostly just have to keep her company, which involves letting her lecture me on every topic she can think of and drag me around by the arm like a favorite doll. She’s a bit on the bossy side, and I’m working on figuring out how to assert myself with her without being confrontational. I’ll admit– having kids who argue back when I ask them to do something (instead of giving me a simple yes or no of some kind) takes getting used to!

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