Home > Autism, Disability Rights > A Call to Action

A Call to Action

[Keep reading. I’m not actually talking about autism]

No one wants to admit this. There is a crisis in this country and across the world. An epidemic, if you will. There is a terrifying large percentage of people with a certain disorder of brain function that involves major deficits in many key areas– including sensory perception, attention, reasoning, communication skills, the ability to prioritize appropriately, and expressive empathy (the ability to respond appropriately to the emotions of others). No one knows for sure what causes this disorder, but both genetics and environmental factors seem to contribute strongly.

These people need our help. Without intensive intervention, most of them will never recover, although some do improve greatly over time on their own. Unfortunately, very few of them are aware that they need help, and even fewer accept that help when it is offered. Teaching them is a long, laborious, intensive process requiring massive amounts of repetition. They just don’t listen. Even when we carefully tailor lessons to their learning style, they learn so slowly, and are so resistant, that it is easy for us to want to give up on them altogether.

We must not give up. These people require billions of dollars worth of services every year. They waste much of their time on worthless obsessions and activities that are useless at best and outright harmful to themselves or others at worst. And while most of them are non-violent, far too many cause serious stress and even pose a physical danger to their families. Many of them become aggressive when asked to change even minor habits and beliefs.

Despite the vast amount of scientific literature on this population, we’ve made very little headway in terms of developing effective strategies to change their problematic behaviors. I should acknowledge that not all people with this disorder demonstrate those behaviors. Some are very high functioning– we tend to see them as quirky rather than burdensome. Others, however, are a serious challenge.

Something needs to change here. As hard as it is for us, as frustrating and heart-breaking as it is to reach out, day after day, to people who seem to have little hope of responding, we cannot simply give up. We need to put serious money towards research, towards training educators and therapists. We have to find a way to help these people become functional members of society, who contribute to the greater good and are no threat to themselves or others.

This tragedy must be halted in its tracks. Help fight the ravages of neurotypicality. The well-being of our children, our nation, even our planet, depends on it.

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  1. June 30, 2015 at 3:33 am

    Reblogged this on mgwebbuddy.

    Like

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