Home > Autism, Special Needs Childcare > Small Miracles

Small Miracles

Here’s the flip side to my last post. Here’s what makes this job worthwhile.

***

Yesterday, an autistic child whose average attention span is about 30 seconds curled up next to me on the couch and let me read almost 30 pages of “The Reason I Jump” out loud.

Yesterday, a girl who generally insists on my undivided attention and loses her temper at the drop of a hat let her sister select several songs in a row without resorting to violence.

Yesterday, a mother who is very strict and concerned with appearances in public lay down on the bedroom floor with her son to cuddle. They were both smiling blissfully.

Yesterday, a parent apologized for interrupting a disabled child’s conversation.

Today, I watched an autistic child tolerate, with good humor, the fumbling attempts of an ABA tech to engage in play-based interaction. The parents are being patient, hoping that they can teach the neurotypical tech how to better interact with autistic children. The kid is being a good sport about it– probably better than I would have been. I think this also answers my question about whether ABA can be totally benign: yes, so long as the family knows what boundaries to set and teaches the kid not to take it too seriously.

Today, a mother felt renewed hope for her child’s future.

Today, the most profoundly autistic child on my roster did so many things I’ve never seen before that I stopped counting. Among them: voluntarily paid attention to something an adult was showing him, used the toilet without prompting, calmly tolerated multiple adults conversing in his presence, shared a trampoline and eye contact with another child, and held a vocal (though not verbal) conversation with the same child.

Should I call these small miracles? Small miracles can be huge. In fact, they are everything.

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: