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It’s a Dog’s World

Here’s an extended metaphor. Imagine a world where the only possible pet is a dog. Dogs are everywhere, and people know a lot about them, but they’ve never heard of any other kind of pet.

Imagine a family going out and getting a puppy, a cute little furry puppy to love and care for and play with and take on long walks. But they soon begin to have concerns that something is wrong with their pet. He is soft and cuddly and adorable, but…

Well, he can’t seem to learn how to walk on a leash, or sit on command, or fetch. His tail is much too long, so long it drags on the ground at times, and he doesn’t wag. They thought he was wagging once or twice, but then he growled and snapped when they tried to pet him. He’s usually affectionate, but  doesn’t like having his belly rubbed, and can even become violent when his family tries to scratch his tummy. They worry about his abnormally small size and his odd sleep schedule, and about how he stretches in ways that can’t possibly be healthy. He only picks at his food, won’t chew bones, and spends a huge amount of time licking his own fur instead. He frequently manages to get onto counters and shelves that a dog shouldn’t be able to get up to, and they are terrified he will fall and get injured. He doesn’t play well with other dogs,and is easily frightened by all sorts of unexpected things. Sadly, he’s never barked, not even once. Instead, he makes odd squeaks and growling noises.

They talk to their friends, who agree that they’ve never seen a dog act like this before. So they take him to the vet.

The vet agrees that there is something wrong. She’s seen dogs like this before, she says, and while there are some things that can help, she is afraid their pet may never be quite normal. She recommends certain foods, and intensive training in obedience school to help the puppy learn how to take better walks and tolerate tummy-rubs. They should spend more time at the park, where he can learn to be less frightened of the bigger dogs. He might never bark, she says, but he’ll probably find other ways to express when he is excited or needs to go out. They should discourage him from making those strange growling sounds, as they will confuse other people and dogs into thinking their puppy is aggressive. She knows it’s hard to have all those other families staring at their weird pet and telling them that they’ve done a lousy job training him. She assures them it isn’t their fault he turned out this way. In terms of appearance, it might help to surgically remove part of his tail, and have him wear a body brace to keep his back from sagging and bending too much.

Now, those of you from planet Earth may have figured it out by now. The problem with this dog is that it isn’t a dog at all– it’s a cat! But these people– the family, their friends, the vet, the trainers– don’t know anything about cats. They only know about dogs.

So what can this family do? Well, they can embark on the program recommended by the vet, and try to make their cat as dog-like as possible. Or they can adapt to life with a cat. They can learn that his “wagging” is actually a sign of unhappiness, that his belly is too sensitive to be petted, and that his strange growling noise– purring!– means that he is content. It’s not going to be easy– they will be the only family on the block who can’t put things on a counter or shelf to keep them out of reach, and they certainly can’t let him off his leash at anyone else’s house. Other people and dogs are often going to be frightened by his purring, assuming he’s growling at them. He doesn’t enjoy many of the activities most dogs do– swimming and frisbee and chew toys– and they worry that he will be lonely and bored much of the time. And what if he gets out of his harness and runs away? Whoever finds him will think he’s a wild animal when he doesn’t respond to “sit” and “stay,” and he might get treated as a stray even though he wears a collar. No matter how dedicated his family is to making their life cat-friendly, there will be some things that will simply never occur to them, like catnip mice and litter boxes.

It isn’t going to be easy trying to change so many things on their cat’s behalf. But the cat is never going to become a dog, either. He may learn to play with dogs, and even enjoy it, and eat their food and walk on a leash and generally fit in well enough for most people to assume he’s just an odd breed. Or he may not. Perhaps only a few people will ever think that it’s ok for him to look and act completely like a cat. But we can dream of a future where people know enough about cats to keep them happy and healthy, even in a dog’s world.